Bitcoin and Crypto Taxes for Capital Gains and Income

This subreddit is for users of Bitcoin in Australia.

This subreddit is for users of Bitcoin in Australia.
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Did you know? Citizens of Australia can use Bitcoin Cash with no capital gains tax if they qualify for the "personal use" exemption.

Did you know? Citizens of Australia can use Bitcoin Cash with no capital gains tax if they qualify for the submitted by ChronosCrypto to btc [link] [comments]

Wandering From the Path? | Monthly Portfolio Update - August 2020

Midway along the journey of our life I woke to find myself in a dark wood, for I had wandered off from the straight path.
Dante, The Divine Comedy: Inferno, Canto I
This is my forty-fifth portfolio update. I complete this update monthly to check my progress against my goal.
Portfolio goal
My objective is to reach a portfolio of $2 180 000 by 1 July 2021. This would produce a real annual income of about $87 000 (in 2020 dollars).
This portfolio objective is based on an expected average real return of 3.99 per cent, or a nominal return of 6.49 per cent.
Portfolio summary
Total portfolio value $1 848 896 (+$48 777 or 2.7%)
Asset allocation
Presented visually, below is a high-level view of the current asset allocation of the portfolio.
[Chart]
Comments
The portfolio has increased in value for the fifth consecutive month, and is starting to approach the monthly value last reached in January.
The portfolio has grown over $48 000, or 2.7 per cent this month, reflecting the strong market recovery since late March
[Chart]
The growth in the portfolio was broadly-based across global and Australian equities, with an increase of around 3.8 per cent. Following strong previous rises, gold holdings decreased by around 2.2 per cent, while Bitcoin continued to increase in value (by 2.5 per cent).
Combined, the value of gold and Bitcoin holdings remain at a new peak, while total equity holdings are still below their late January peak to the tune of around $50 000. The fixed income holdings of the portfolio continue to fall below the target allocation.
[Chart]
The expanding value of gold and Bitcoin holdings since January last year have actually had the practical effect of driving new investments into equities, since effectively for each dollar of appreciation, for example, my target allocation to equities rises by seven dollars.
New investments this month have been in the Vanguard international shares exchange-traded fund (VGS) and the Australian shares equivalent (VAS). These have been directed to bring my actual asset allocation more closely in line with the target split between Australian and global shares set out in the portfolio plan.
As the exchange traded funds such as VGS, VAS and Betashares A200 now make up nearly 30 per cent of the overall portfolio, the quarterly payments they provide have increased in magnitude and importance. Early in the journey, third quarter distributions were essentially immaterial events.
Using the same 'median per unit' forecast approach as recently used for half yearly forecasts would suggest a third quarter payout due at the end of September of around $6000. Due to significant announced dividend reductions across this year I am, however, currently assuming this is likely to be significantly lower, and perhaps in the vicinity of $4000 or less.
Finding true north: approach to achieving a set asset allocation
One of the choices facing all investors with a preferred asset allocation is how strictly the target is applied over time, and what variability is acceptable around that. There is a significant body of financial literature around that issue.
My own approach has been to seek to target the preferred asset allocation dynamically, through buying the asset class that is furthest from its target, with new portfolio contributions, and re-investment of paid out distributions.
As part of monitoring asset allocation, I also track a measure of 'absolute' variance, to understand at a whole of portfolio level how far it is from the desired allocation.
This is the sum of the absolute value of variances (e.g. so that being 3 per cent under target in shares, and 7 per cent over target in fixed interest will equal an absolute variance of 10 per cent under this measure).
This measure is currently sitting near its highest level in around 2 years, at 15.0 per cent, as can be seen in the chart below.
[Chart]
The dominant reason for this higher level of variance from target is significant appreciation in the price of gold and Bitcoin holdings.
Mapping the sources of portfolio variances
Changes in target allocations in the past makes direct comparisons problematic, but previous peaks of the variance measure matches almost perfectly past Bitcoin price movements.
For a brief period in January 2018, gold and Bitcoin combined constituted 20 per cent, or 1 in 5 dollars of the entire portfolio. Due to the growth in other equity components of the portfolio since this level has not been subsequently exceeded.
Nonetheless, it is instructive to understand that the dollar value of combined gold and Bitcoin holdings is actually up around $40 000 from that brief peak. With the larger portfolio, this now means they together make up 17.2 per cent of the total portfolio value.
Tacking into the wind of portfolio movements?
The logical question to fall out from this situation is: to what extent should this drive an active choice to sell down gold and Bitcoin until they resume their 10 per cent target allocation?
This would currently imply selling around $130 000 of gold or Bitcoin, and generating a capital gains tax liability of potentially up to $27 000. Needless to say this is not an attractive proposition. Several other considerations lead me to not make this choice:
This approach is a departure from a mechanistic implementation of an asset allocation rule. Rather, the approach I take is pragmatic.
Tracking course drift in the portfolio components
As an example, I regularly review whether a significant fall in Bitcoin prices to its recent lows would alter my monthly decision on where to direct new investments. So far it does not, and the 'signal' continues to be to buy new equities.
Another tool I use is a monthly measurement of the absolute dollar variance of Australian and global shares, as well as fixed interest, from their ideal target allocations.
The chart below sets this out for the period since January 2019. A positive value effectively represents an over-allocation to a sector, a negative value, an under-allocation compared to target.
[Chart]
This reinforces the overall story that, as gold and Bitcoin have grown in value, there emerges a larger 'deficit' to the target. Falls in equities markets across February and March also produce visibly larger 'dollar gaps' to the target allocation.
This graph enables a tracking of the impact of portfolio gains or losses, and volatility, and a better understanding of the practical task of returning to target allocations. Runaway lines in either direction would be evidence that current approaches for returning to targets were unworkable, but so far this does not appear to be the case.
A crossing over: a credit card FI milestone
This month has seen a long awaited milestone reached.
Calculated on a past three year average, portfolio distributions now entirely meet monthly credit card expenses. This means that every credit card purchase - each shopping trip or online purchase - is effectively paid for by average portfolio distributions.
At the start of this journey, distributions were only equivalent to around 40 per cent of credit card expenses. As time has progressed distributions have increased to cover a larger and larger proportion of card expenses.
[Chart]
Most recently, with COVID-19 related restrictions having pushed card expenditure down further, the remaining gap to this 'Credit Card FI' target has closed.
Looked at on an un-smoothed basis, expenditures on the credit card have continued to be slightly lower than average across the past month. The below chart details the extent to which portfolio distributions (red) cover estimated total expenses (green), measured month to month.
[Chart]
Credit card expenditure makes up around 80 per cent of total spending, so this is not a milestone that makes paid work irrelevant or optional. Similarly, if spending rises as various travel and other restrictions ease, it is possible that this position could be temporary.
Equally, should distributions fall dramatically below long term averages in the year ahead, this could result in average distributions falling faster than average monthly card expenditure. Even without this, on a three year average basis, monthly distributions will decline as high distributions received in the second half of 2017 slowly fall out of the estimation sample.
For the moment, however, a slim margin exists. Distributions are $13 per month above average monthly credit card bills. This feels like a substantial achievement to note, as one unlooked for at the outset of the journey.
Progress
Progress against the objective, and the additional measures I have reached is set out below.
Measure Portfolio All Assets
Portfolio objective – $2 180 000 (or $87 000 pa) 84.8% 114.6%
Credit card purchases – $71 000 pa 103.5% 139.9%
Total expenses – $89 000 pa 82.9% 112.1%
Summary
What feels like a long winter is just passed. The cold days and weeks have felt repetitive and dominated by a pervasive sense of uncertainty. Yet through this time, this wandering off, the portfolio has moved quite steadily back towards it previous highs. That it is even approaching them in the course of just a few months is unexpected.
What this obscures is the different components of growth driving this outcome. The portfolio that is recovering, like the index it follows, is changing in its underlying composition. This can be seen most starkly in the high levels of variance from the target portfolio sought discussed above.
It is equally true, however, of individual components such as international equity holdings. In the case of the United States the overall index performance has been driven by share price growth in just a few information technology giants. Gold and Bitcoin have emerged from the shadows of the portfolio to an unintended leading role in portfolio growth since early 2019.
This month I have enjoyed reading the Chapter by Chapter release of the Aussie FIRE e-book coordinated by Pearler. I've also been reading posts from some newer Australian financial independence bloggers, Two to Fire, FIRE Down Under, and Chasing FIRE Down Under.
In podcasts, I have enjoyed the Mad Fientist's update on his fourth year of financial freedom, and Pat and Dave's FIRE and Chill episodes, including an excellent one on market timing fallacies.
The ASX Australian Investor Study 2020 has also been released - setting out some broader trends in recent Australian investment markets, and containing a snapshot of the holdings, approaches and views of everyday investors. This contained many intriguing findings, such as the median investment portfolio ($130 000), its most frequent components (direct Australian shares), and how frequently portfolios are usually checked - with 61 per cent of investors checking their portfolios at least once a month.
This is my own approach also. Monthly assessments allow me to gauge and reflect on how I or elements of the portfolio may have wandered off the straight way in the middle of the journey. Without this, the risk is that dark woods and bent pathways beckon.
The post, links and full charts can be seen here.
submitted by thefiexpl to fiaustralia [link] [comments]

Buying Rolex with Bitcoin

Has anyone here ever bought a Rolex with bitcoin? I’m am looking into buying from DavidSW next year while living in Australia. Am I able to send him my coins without going through a merchant? Hoping to do this so I can get out of paying capital gains tax.
submitted by plxxx to rolex [link] [comments]

If I buy Bitcoin in the UK and sell it in Australia (or vice versa) how does that complicate tax?

I'm a dual citizen but reside in AU - My initial plan is to buy with my UK tax-free inheritance using £GBP, probably wait for a short time for the value to increase to cover the fees, and sell partially for AUD$, while holding the rest as a Bitcoin investment for more than a year, or until the peak of the next bull run.
In Australia if you hold for more than a year there's a 50% discount in capital gains tax, but what if I didn't buy it in Aus?
I'm unsure how to pay the least tax when I sell Bitcoin. The UK tax-free exemption yearly limit for all investments is £11,700 so perhaps I can sell this much worth for £ each year. Then if I spend it with my UK debit card in AU does that have tax implications in AU?
Thanks!
submitted by aceventura33 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Best ways to buy Bitcoin in Japan?

I have purchased Bitcoin (and other crypto) before on Australian and Chinese exchanges, as well as LocalBitcoins in the past, but have never bought any in Japan. Was wondering what people's recommendations for a local exchange/wallet are? Looking for something FSA-approved and low fees.
I hear Bitflyer thrown around a lot, does anyone have any experience with that? I also see Rakuten has opened something called Rakuten Wallet but never heard of anyone using it.
Extra question in case anyone knows: If I buy Bitcoin in Japan, but sent the Bitcoin to an Australian exchange and then sold it later on the Australian exchange, how would tax be calculated? I assume I would need to record the equivalent AUD price when I bought it (despite having purchased in yen), and then calculate if there is a capital gain when I sold later in AUD. But do I pay tax to Japan or Australia in this case?
submitted by unborderedlife to japanlife [link] [comments]

Testing the Tide | Monthly FIRE Portfolio Update - June 2020

We would rather be ruined than changed.
-W H Auden, The Age of Anxiety
This is my forty-third portfolio update. I complete this update monthly to check my progress against my goal.
Portfolio goal
My objective is to reach a portfolio of $2 180 000 by 1 July 2021. This would produce a real annual income of about $87 000 (in 2020 dollars).
This portfolio objective is based on an expected average real return of 3.99 per cent, or a nominal return of 6.49 per cent.
Portfolio summary
Vanguard Lifestrategy High Growth Fund – $726 306
Vanguard Lifestrategy Growth Fund – $42 118
Vanguard Lifestrategy Balanced Fund – $78 730
Vanguard Diversified Bonds Fund – $111 691
Vanguard Australian Shares ETF (VAS) – $201 745
Vanguard International Shares ETF (VGS) – $39 357
Betashares Australia 200 ETF (A200) – $231 269
Telstra shares (TLS) – $1 668
Insurance Australia Group shares (IAG) – $7 310
NIB Holdings shares (NHF) – $5 532
Gold ETF (GOLD.ASX) – $117 757
Secured physical gold – $18 913
Ratesetter (P2P lending) – $10 479
Bitcoin – $148 990
Raiz app (Aggressive portfolio) – $16 841
Spaceship Voyager app (Index portfolio) – $2 553
BrickX (P2P rental real estate) – $4 484
Total portfolio value: $1 765 743 (+$8 485 or 0.5%)
Asset allocation
Australian shares – 42.2% (2.8% under)
Global shares – 22.0%
Emerging markets shares – 2.3%
International small companies – 3.0%
Total international shares – 27.3% (2.7% under)
Total shares – 69.5% (5.5% under)
Total property securities – 0.3% (0.3% over)
Australian bonds – 4.7%
International bonds – 9.4%
Total bonds – 14.0% (1.0% under)
Gold – 7.7%
Bitcoin – 8.4%
Gold and alternatives – 16.2% (6.2% over)
Presented visually, below is a high-level view of the current asset allocation of the portfolio.
[Chart]
Comments
The overall portfolio increased slightly over the month. This has continued to move the portfolio beyond the lows seen in late March.
The modest portfolio growth of $8 000, or 0.5 per cent, maintains its value at around that achieved at the beginning of the year.
[Chart]
The limited growth this month largely reflects an increase in the value of my current equity holdings, in VAS and A200 and the Vanguard retail funds. This has outweighed a small decline in the value of Bitcoin and global shares. The value of the bond holdings also increased modestly, pushing them to their highest value since around early 2017.
[Chart]
There still appears to be an air of unreality around recent asset price increases and the broader economic context. Britain's Bank of England has on some indicators shown that the aftermath of the pandemic and lockdown represent the most challenging financial crisis in around 300 years. What is clear is that investor perceptions and fear around the coronavirus pandemic are a substantial ongoing force driving volatility in equity markets (pdf).
A somewhat optimistic view is provided here that the recovery could look more like the recovery from a natural disaster, rather than a traditional recession. Yet there are few certainties on offer. Negative oil prices, and effective offers by US equity investors to bail out Hertz creditors at no cost appear to be signs of a financial system under significant strains.
As this Reserve Bank article highlights, while some Australian households are well-placed to weather the storm ahead, the timing and severity of what lays ahead is an important unknown that will itself feed into changes in household wealth from here.
Investments this month have been exclusively in the Australian shares exchange-traded fund (VAS) using Selfwealth.* This has been to bring my actual asset allocation more closely in line with the target split between Australian and global shares.
A moving azimuth: falling spending continues
Monthly expenses on the credit card have continued their downward trajectory across the past month.
[Chart]
The rolling average of monthly credit card spending is now at its lowest point over the period of the journey. This is despite the end of lockdown, and a slow resumption of some more normal aspects of spending.
This has continued the brief period since April of the achievement of a notional and contingent kind of financial independence.
The below chart illustrates this temporary state, setting out the degree to which portfolio distributions cover estimated total expenses, measured month to month.
[Chart]
There are two sources of volatility underlying its movement. The first is the level of expenses, which can vary, and the second is the fact that it is based on financial year distributions, which are themselves volatile.
Importantly, the distributions over the last twelve months of this chart is only an estimate - and hence the next few weeks will affect the precision of this analysis across its last 12 observations.
Estimating 2019-20 financial year portfolio distributions
Since the beginning of the journey, this time of year usually has sense of waiting for events to unfold - in particular, finding out the level of half-year distributions to June.
These represent the bulk of distributions, usually averaging 60-65 per cent of total distributions received. They are an important and tangible signpost of progress on the financial independence journey.
This is no simple task, as distributions have varied in size considerably.
A part of this variation has been the important role of sometimes large and lumpy capital distributions - which have made up between 30 to 48 per cent of total distributions in recent years, and an average of around 15 per cent across the last two decades.
I have experimented with many different approaches, most of which have relied on averaging over multi-year periods to even out the 'peaks and troughs' of how market movements may have affected distributions. The main approaches have been:
Each of these have their particular simplifications, advantages and drawbacks.
Developing new navigation tools
Over the past month I have also developed more fully an alternate 'model' for estimating returns.
This simply derives a median value across a set of historical 'cents per unit' distribution data for June and December payouts for the Vanguard funds and exchange traded funds. These make up over 96 per cent of income producing portfolio assets.
In other words, this model essentially assumes that each Vanguard fund and ETF owned pays out the 'average' level of distributions this half-year, with the average being based on distribution records that typically go back between 5 to 10 years.
Mapping the distribution estimates
The chart below sets out the estimate produced by each approach for the June distributions that are to come.
[Chart]
Some observations on these findings can be made.
The lowest estimate is the 'adjusted GFC income' observation, which essentially assumes that the income for this period is as low as experienced by the equity and bond portfolio during the Global Financial Crisis. Just due to timing differences of the period observed, this seems to be a 'worst case' lower bound estimate, which I do not currently place significant weight on.
Similarly, at the highest end, the 'average distribution rate' approach simply assumes June distributions deliver a distribution equal to the median that the entire portfolio has delivered since 1999. With higher interest rates, and larger fixed income holdings across much of that time, this seems an objectively unlikely outcome.
Similarly, the delivery of exactly the income suggested by long-term averages measured across decades and even centuries would be a matter of chance, rather than the basis for rational expectations.
Central estimates of the line of position
This leaves the estimates towards the centre of the chart - estimates of between around $28 000 to $43 000 as representing the more likely range.
I attach less weight to the historical three-year average due to the high contribution of distributed capital gains over that period of growth, where at least across equities some capital losses are likely to be in greater presence.
My preferred central estimate is the model estimate (green) , as it is based in historical data directly from the investment vehicles rather than my own evolving portfolio. The data it is based on in some cases goes back to the Global Financial Crisis. This estimate is also quite close to the raw average of all the alternative approaches (red). It sits a little above the 'adjusted income' measure.
None of these estimates, it should be noted, contain any explicit adjustment for the earnings and dividend reductions or delays arising from COVID-19. They may, therefore represent a modest over-estimate for likely June distributions, to the extent that these effects are more negative than those experienced on average across the period of the underlying data.
These are difficult to estimate, but dividend reductions could easily be in the order of 20-30 per cent, plausibly lowering distributions to the $23 000 to $27 000 range. The recently announced forecast dividend for the Vanguard Australian Shares ETF (VAS) is, for example, the lowest in four years.
As seen from chart above, there is a wide band of estimates, which grow wider still should capital gains be unexpectedly distributed from the Vanguard retail funds. These have represented a source of considerable volatility. Given this, it may seem fruitless to seek to estimate these forthcoming distributions, compared to just waiting for them to arrive.
Yet this exercise helps by setting out reasoning and positions, before hindsight bias urgently arrives to inform me that I knew the right answer all along. It also potentially helps clearly 'reject' some models over time, if the predictions they make prove to be systematically incorrect.
Progress
Progress against the objective, and the additional measures I have reached is set out below.
Measure Portfolio All Assets
Portfolio objective – $2 180 000 (or $87 000 pa) 81.0% 109.4%
Credit card purchases – $71 000 pa 98.8% 133.5%
Total expenses – $89 000 pa 79.2% 106.9%
Summary
The current coronavirus conditions are affecting all aspects of the journey to financial independence - changing spending habits, leading to volatility in equity markets and sequencing risks, and perhaps dramatically altering the expected pattern of portfolio distributions.
Although history can provide some guidance, there is simply no definitive way to know whether any or all of these changes will be fundamental and permanent alterations, or simply data points on a post-natural disaster path to a different post-pandemic set of conditions. There is the temptation to fit past crises imperfectly into the modern picture, as this Of Dollars and Data post illustrates well.
Taking a longer 100 year view, this piece 'The Allegory of the Hawk and Serpent' is a reminder that our entire set of received truths about constructing a portfolio to survive for the long-term can be a product of a sample size of one - actual past history - and subject to recency bias.
This month has felt like one of quiet routines, muted events compared to the past few months, and waiting to understand more fully the shape of the new. Nonetheless, with each new investment, or week of lower expenditure than implied in my FI target, the nature of the journey is incrementally changing - beneath the surface.
Small milestones are being passed - such as over 40 per cent of my equity holdings being outside of the the Vanguard retail funds. Or these these retail funds - which once formed over 95 per cent of the portfolio - now making up less than half.
With a significant part of the financial independence journey being about repeated small actions producing outsized results with time, the issue of maintaining good routines while exploring beneficial changes is real.
Adding to the complexity is that embarking on the financial journey itself is likely to change who one is. This idea, of the difficulty or impossibility of knowing the preferences of a future self, is explored in a fascinating way in this Econtalk podcast episode with a philosophical thought experiment about vampires. It poses the question: perhaps we can never know ourselves at the destination? And yet, who would rationally choose ruin over any change?
The post, links and full charts can be seen here.
submitted by thefiexpl to fiaustralia [link] [comments]

Why Bitcoin remains a marginal vehicle for store of value (at best) vs. Gold

There is no doubt that times like these necessitate asset diversification.
Some candidates include Bitcoin (“BTC”) and Gold (“XAU”). We have an on-going debate with one of my best friends about Bitcoin.
He is a firm believer in BTC due to (i) the printing of money by central banks, (ii) the lost of faith in governments and (iii) the technological advantage over traditional gold
[Original post with charts: https://bankeronwheels.com/bitcoin-a-marginal-vehicle-for-store-of-value/ ]
I think of BTC as an electronic version of gold:
Lindy effect – which is most likely to survive?
If you store value, the most important aspect is for the asset class to survive. Made popular by Nicholas Taleb, the Lindy effect states that the future life expectancy of some non-perishable things like a technology or an idea is proportional to their current age, so that every additional period of survival implies a longer remaining life expectancy.
Gold has been around for centuries and will be around in the next decades. As with Bitcoin, the currency may be around or could be replaced by a more efficient one (e.g. from transaction perspective). If you consider some of your savings as a means to secure a future for you and your kids then Gold is much more likely to fulfill this objective – although one needs to be reminded that this both asset classes don’t generate any income and as such can be used as diversifiers and potentially partially rotated into more risky assets when the market turns.
Price stability
If we assume that currently the main use for both is the store of value (BTC is only marginally used as transactional currency) then price stability is key. Gold prices are more stable and largely correlated to (i) real rates (ii) strength of USD and (iii) macro outlook. Arguably, Gold is less prone to price manipulation as one of the most traded assets (daily volumes can be as high as the total market cap of BTC).
It goes without saying that BTC can provide you with better returns as it’s more speculative in nature. The purpose of this blog however is to analyse assets from a savings allocation perspective and thus taking into consideration the risk you’re taking.
Insurance against market crash
While both BTC and XAU increased in value along with other risk assets prior to the crisis, the subsequent drop was much more significant for BTC while XAU only experienced marginal losses due to forced liquidations from investors highlighting the speculative nature of BTC.
As such Gold provides a good insurance policy as long as the crash in not excessively severe in nature – in 2008 Gold has initially dropped in value due to liquidations before rallying.
Another potential diversifiers that act as insurance for equity portfolios are government bonds. Treasuries have also experienced some volatility due to liquidations but are different to BTC and XAU as the FED controls the short term maturity asset yields and now even considering controlling the longer end of the curvesimilar to other countries like Japan or Australia
Doom scenario(s)
Both assets have major issues since Gold can’t be easily transported/accessed in case of a major natural disaster and BTC will miserably fail when electricity is down (earthquake, tsunami etc). Electronic Gold suffers from the same shortcoming hence physical gold has an edge here
Possible Near term Prospects
The technology behind BTC is very powerful. I’d also agree that conceptually is the best form of money that has ever been invented. Regarding BTC, in the end my friend and I will probably meet somewhere in the middle . A marginal part of the receivers of US fiscal measures may invest the cash in BTC. I have seen a large group of anti-establishment people on the West Coast while cycling from Vancouver to San Francisco last summer and there is a likelihood that these people will drive the BTC price up in the near term. However, due mainly to the price stability issue and perceived complexity I am yet to see a significant part of population that would allocate a sizeable part of their savings in BTC. And this brings me to my last point – skin in the game. So far, my friend only allocated a small amount of his net worth to BTC…
[As originally posted with charts on https://bankeronwheels.com/bitcoin-a-marginal-vehicle-for-store-of-value/ ]
submitted by bankeronwheels to Gold [link] [comments]

Crypto Regulation in Countries which witnessed Spike in Crypto Interest

CoinMarketCap, one of the most preferred sources for crypto market capitulation has recently released the graph of countries that have registered a surge in crypto usage. The report named nine countries including Nigeria, Australia, Spain, Canada, Mexico, U.K., Colombia, India, and Pakistan which marked huge growth in Cryptocurrency Interest. However, it is pivotal to understand the type of crypto regulations, frameworks ad polices these countries are entertaining.
Nigeria - With Nigeria being one of the biggest countries in the world population-wise, it also boasts of being one of the leading countries in Africa in terms of GDP boasting of about $500 billion nominal GDP returns. Taking a look at the crypto regulation in Nigeria, Bitcoin and all other forms of crypto are all legal although the Security Exchange Commission in the country has warned the population of the high risk involved. With the previous move by the government of Nigeria to ban crypto trading, the regulations are still unclear with the government issuing strong warnings of the volatility in the market.
Spain - Spain mirrors Nigeria in the way that digital assets are approached in the country with the European nation not having a single regulation when it comes to crypto adoption. The Spanish government joined forces with the Spanish Security and Exchange Commission to teach investors on the dangers of trading in crypto assets. Even with the absence of regulations, the government has said that it does not see crypto as a means of tender, they may be referred to as securities.
Australia - As far back as 2017, when Bitcoin was trying to make its mark in the financial market, Australia was one of the few countries that moved swiftly to encourage the budding investment. The government declared the digital assets a legal investment in the country and as such is treated as property while being subject to Capital Gains Tax. Previously, Australia subjected crypto assets to a double taxation scheme with the assets classed under the Goods and Services Tax but the recent change has encouraged a widespread adoption.
Canada - Canada has swiftly moved to ask all businesses and investments to register their respective firms under the FinTRAC as their activities would be monitored by the body to check fraud and money laundering. The new crypto law according to FinTRAC is that all transactions that are more than $7,000 should be duly noted. The sending and receiving party should be identified and failure to do so would attract severe charges. The new law has given investors a huge relief in terms of eliminating fears of fraud.
Mexico - Mexico enacted a new law to guide crypto in March 2018 but was met with resistance across the country. The new law states that cryptocurrencies were illegal but could be used as a means of payment across the country. The new law states specifically that Banxico, the country's central bank should monitor all crypto activities and would report all unauthorized transactions whilst handing out fines to businesses that fail to adhere to the instructions. The major boost is that crypto businesses have not been levied with a clear tax system as regards digital assets.
United kingdom - Ever since the wide adoption of crypto around the world, the United kingdom has always measured the activities of crypto exchanges across the country. Even though the government has refused to see digital assets as a means of legal tender, they have moved swiftly to enforce a registration with the FCA amongst the exchanges in the country. With no ground laws in place to monitor the activities of the exchange, the country has levied the capital gains tax on individuals and investments dealing in cryptocurrencies.
Colombia - Colombia has one of the worst rules and regulations when it comes to crypto adoption. Presently, the country lacks a legal framework when it comes to regulating crypto. With the country witnessing a 61% growth in terms of FinTech companies despite the seemingly unregulated activities of crypto exchanges in the country. With the Colombian law failing to recognize cryptocurrency trading as a legal investment, most of the exchanges in the country are always subject to losing their services for handling of illegal transactions.
India - India recently passed a bill into law that said that banks can now work with crypto exchanges in the country. This development comes after the legality of crypto exchanges and the laws that govern them were called into questions after the Supreme Court permitted them to carry out their activities in the country. Presently, the trading of crypto in the Asian country is legal and has seen so many adoptions even before the court ruled in its favor. With a legal framework scheduled to be drafted in the coming weeks, only time will tell if it would favor more adoption.
Pakistan - Pakistan issued a blanket ban on crypto investments across the country in 2019 but has soon suspended the ban and asked all crypto exchanges and service providers to register their business with the state bank of Pakistan. The country executives are presently going into a meeting to discuss how the legal frameworks for the adoption of crypto would be in the country. Despite the ban that was effective since last year, the majority of the Pakistan population has owned cryptos in other countries but can now comfortably trade in their own country.
submitted by Bit2buzz to btc [link] [comments]

Does lending your crypto to defi platform trigger a taxable event?

Obviously the interest you earn on lending crypto is a taxable event but does lending the coins trigger a capital gains event? The ATO in this post below appears to be saying yes.
https://community.ato.gov.au/t5/Cryptocurrency/Tax-implications-on-lending-Bitcoin/td-p/25488/page/2
This would make long term holders very unlikely to want to lend their coins as they will have to pay the capital gain on those coins. This will really slow the development of defi in Australia if the ATO takes this interpretation.
Has anyone looked into this?
Update - ATO appears to be sticking to their guns about the having to pay capital gains on the coins you lend as well as the coins you receive. This will be a bummer for people wanting to lend their coins that have unrealised capital gains.
https://community.ato.gov.au/t5/Cryptocurrency/Tax-implications-of-DeFi-loaning-applications-such-as-compound/td-p/21012
submitted by HelloMyDroogs to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

Why Bitcoin remains a marginal vehicle for store of value (at best) vs. Gold

There is no doubt that times like these necessitate asset diversification.
Some candidates include Bitcoin (“BTC”) and Gold (“XAU”). We have an on-going debate with one of my best friends about Bitcoin.
He is a firm believer in BTC due to (i) the printing of money by central banks, (ii) the lost of faith in governments and (iii) the technological advantage over traditional gold
[Original post with charts: https://bankeronwheels.com/bitcoin-a-marginal-vehicle-for-store-of-value/ ]
I think of BTC as an electronic version of gold:

Lindy effect – which is most likely to survive?

If you store value, the most important aspect is for the asset class to survive. Made popular by Nicholas Taleb, the Lindy effect states that the future life expectancy of some non-perishable things like a technology or an idea is proportional to their current age, so that every additional period of survival implies a longer remaining life expectancy.
Gold has been around for centuries and will be around in the next decades. As with Bitcoin, the currency may be around or could be replaced by a more efficient one (e.g. from transaction perspective). If you consider some of your savings as a means to secure a future for you and your kids then Gold is much more likely to fulfill this objective – although one needs to be reminded that this both asset classes don’t generate any income and as such can be used as diversifiers and potentially partially rotated into more risky assets when the market turns.

Price stability

If we assume that currently the main use for both is the store of value (BTC is only marginally used as transactional currency) then price stability is key. Gold prices are more stable and largely correlated to (i) real rates (ii) strength of USD and (iii) macro outlook. Arguably, Gold is less prone to price manipulation as one of the most traded assets (daily volumes can be as high as the total market cap of BTC).
It goes without saying that BTC can provide you with better returns as it’s more speculative in nature. The purpose of this blog however is to analyse assets from a savings allocation perspective and thus taking into consideration the risk you’re taking.

Insurance against market crash

While both BTC and XAU increased in value along with other risk assets prior to the crisis, the subsequent drop was much more significant for BTC while XAU only experienced marginal losses due to forced liquidations from investors highlighting the speculative nature of BTC.
As such Gold provides a good insurance policy as long as the crash in not excessively severe in nature – in 2008 Gold has initially dropped in value due to liquidations before rallying.
Another potential diversifiers that act as insurance for equity portfolios are government bonds. Treasuries have also experienced some volatility due to liquidations but are different to BTC and XAU as the FED controls the short term maturity asset yields and now even considering controlling the longer end of the curvesimilar to other countries like Japan or Australia

Doom scenario(s)

Both assets have major issues since Gold can’t be easily transported/accessed in case of a major natural disaster and BTC will miserably fail when electricity is down (earthquake, tsunami etc). Electronic Gold suffers from the same shortcoming hence physical gold has an edge here

Possible Near term Prospects

The technology behind BTC is very powerful. I’d also agree that conceptually is the best form of money that has ever been invented. Regarding BTC, in the end my friend and I will probably meet somewhere in the middle . A marginal part of the receivers of US fiscal measures may invest the cash in BTC. I have seen a large group of anti-establishment people on the West Coast while cycling from Vancouver to San Francisco last summer and there is a likelihood that these people will drive the BTC price up in the near term. However, due mainly to the price stability issue and perceived complexity I am yet to see a significant part of population that would allocate a sizeable part of their savings in BTC. And this brings me to my last point – skin in the game. So far, my friend only allocated a small amount of his net worth to BTC…
[As originally posted with charts on https://bankeronwheels.com/bitcoin-a-marginal-vehicle-for-store-of-value/ ]
submitted by bankeronwheels to InvestmentEducation [link] [comments]

GAINS Announcements

Crypto News Summary- May 4
🔹 General News: — VeChain, Mastercard and Alipay join Australia-China supply chain consortium — Iran issues license for biggest bitcoin mining farm — German security token platform, Black Manta Capital Partners to develop a custody solution
🔹 Coin Specific News: — Matic will start its second DApp Week as of May 4 — RiveX released desktop version of its wallet — Kyber to offer delegated token staking after network upgrade — Bitcoin price retraces to $8.5K going into last week before halving — USDT and USDC market caps swell in April as crypto traders flock to Stablecoins — NEAR Protocol launches following $21M token sale
🔹 Exchanges: — BitMEX restricts access to Japanese residents, citing changes to local law — Indian crypto exchanges seek tax clarity from central bank — Paxful launches Bitcoin fundraising campaign to combat COVID-19 in Africa
🔹 Cool tech fact: In 2017, it’s estimated that 269 billion e-mails were sent per day
💬 Quote of the day: “Be grateful for what you already have while you pursue your goals. If you aren’t grateful for what you already have, what makes you think you would be happy with more.” ― Roy T. Bennett
🔹 Brought to you by @GainsANN
submitted by GAINS-Associates to CryptoNews [link] [comments]

Why Bitcoin remains a marginal vehicle for store of value (at best) vs. Gold

There is no doubt that times like these necessitate asset diversification.
Some candidates include Bitcoin (“BTC”) and Gold (“XAU”). We have an on-going debate with one of my best friends about Bitcoin.
He is a firm believer in BTC due to (i) the printing of money by central banks, (ii) the lost of faith in governments and (iii) the technological advantage over traditional gold
[Original post with charts: https://bankeronwheels.com/bitcoin-a-marginal-vehicle-for-store-of-value/ ]
I think of BTC as an electronic version of gold:
Lindy effect – which is most likely to survive?
If you store value, the most important aspect is for the asset class to survive. Made popular by Nicholas Taleb, the Lindy effect states that the future life expectancy of some non-perishable things like a technology or an idea is proportional to their current age, so that every additional period of survival implies a longer remaining life expectancy.
Gold has been around for centuries and will be around in the next decades. As with Bitcoin, the currency may be around or could be replaced by a more efficient one (e.g. from transaction perspective). If you consider some of your savings as a means to secure a future for you and your kids then Gold is much more likely to fulfill this objective – although one needs to be reminded that this both asset classes don’t generate any income and as such can be used as diversifiers and potentially partially rotated into more risky assets when the market turns.
Price stability
If we assume that currently the main use for both is the store of value (BTC is only marginally used as transactional currency) then price stability is key. Gold prices are more stable and largely correlated to (i) real rates (ii) strength of USD and (iii) macro outlook. Arguably, Gold is less prone to price manipulation as one of the most traded assets (daily volumes can be as high as the total market cap of BTC).
It goes without saying that BTC can provide you with better returns as it’s more speculative in nature. The purpose of this blog however is to analyse assets from a savings allocation perspective and thus taking into consideration the risk you’re taking.
Insurance against market crash
While both BTC and XAU increased in value along with other risk assets prior to the crisis, the subsequent drop was much more significant for BTC while XAU only experienced marginal losses due to forced liquidations from investors highlighting the speculative nature of BTC.
As such Gold provides a good insurance policy as long as the crash in not excessively severe in nature – in 2008 Gold has initially dropped in value due to liquidations before rallying.
Another potential diversifiers that act as insurance for equity portfolios are government bonds. Treasuries have also experienced some volatility due to liquidations but are different to BTC and XAU as the FED controls the short term maturity asset yields and now even considering controlling the longer end of the curvesimilar to other countries like Japan or Australia
Doom scenario(s)
Both assets have major issues since Gold can’t be easily transported/accessed in case of a major natural disaster and BTC will miserably fail when electricity is down (earthquake, tsunami etc). Electronic Gold suffers from the same shortcoming hence physical gold has an edge here
Possible Near term Prospects
The technology behind BTC is very powerful. I’d also agree that conceptually is the best form of money that has ever been invented. Regarding BTC, in the end my friend and I will probably meet somewhere in the middle . A marginal part of the receivers of US fiscal measures may invest the cash in BTC. I have seen a large group of anti-establishment people on the West Coast while cycling from Vancouver to San Francisco last summer and there is a likelihood that these people will drive the BTC price up in the near term. However, due mainly to the price stability issue and perceived complexity I am yet to see a significant part of population that would allocate a sizeable part of their savings in BTC. And this brings me to my last point – skin in the game. So far, my friend only allocated a small amount of his net worth to BTC…
[As originally posted with charts on https://bankeronwheels.com/bitcoin-a-marginal-vehicle-for-store-of-value/ ]
submitted by bankeronwheels to Commodities [link] [comments]

Tax on Bitcoin in Australia

Say an early adopter wanted to sell Bitcoins today, what is the tax implications? What if they have no records from back in 2011-2012?
submitted by 1bitcoineater to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

In case you're new here, or just stupid, whenever you convert Bitcoin to cash on an exchange, it is recorded, and the tax man will know.

submitted by DestroyerOfShitcoins to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Keeping a Reckoning | Monthly FIRE Portfolio Update – September 2019

We may by care and skill be able to trim our ship, to steer our course, or to keep our reckoning; but we cannot control the winds, or subdue deceitful currents, or prevent disasters.
The Sailors’ Prayer Book: A Manual of Devotion for Sailors at Sea (1852)
This is my thirty-fourth portfolio update. I complete this update monthly to check my progress against my goals.

Portfolio goals

My objectives are to reach a portfolio of:
Both of these are based on an expected average real return of 4.19 per cent, or a nominal return of 7.19 per cent, and are expressed in 2018 dollars.

Portfolio summary

Total value: $1 729 662 (+$17 325)

Asset allocation

Presented visually, below is a high-level view of the current asset allocation of the portfolio.[Chart]

Comments

This month the portfolio grew by just over $17 000 in total, following two consecutive months of small declines.[Chart]
The total equity component of the portfolio has grown, including through new contributions and another part of the June distributions being 'averaged into' equity markets. The only major reductions in the portfolio has been the result of a sharp downward movement in the price of Bitcoin.
[Chart]
Lower credit card expenditure and the gradual increase of the trailing three year average of distributions paid has helped sustain a sense of momentum this month. Together they have continued to narrow the gap between distributions paid and credit card spending to less than $500 per month.
[Chart]
The complete closure of the remaining gap is within sight. Assuming no sustained reversals in the absolute level of distributions through time, this could happen in the next 12 months.
Some added progress towards this goal should come from pending quarterly distributions from the Betashares A200 ETF and Vanguard's Australian shares ETF (VAS). These are currently being finalised. The draft distributions guidance indicates that for A200 and VAS these quarterly distribution should total around $4 700, approximately double the absolute level of the same quarterly distributions a year ago.
New investments this month have been higher than normal due to a work bonus and the staggered reinvestment of June distributions. They have been directed predominantly to Vanguard's Australian Shares ETF (VAS), with a small recent allocation to Vanguard's international shares ETF (VGS). Following the recent fee reduction in VAS, I have directed Australian purchases through to this ETF, preferring the (slightly) wider exposure it delivers through following the ASX300, compared to the Betashares A200's slightly narrower holdings.
The end of 'the big rebalance' into Australian equities
The reason for the split between Australian and international equity purchases is that this month has seen the effective end of 'the big rebalance' - that is, the gradual movement to a 60/40 split between Australian and international shares.
This was first targeted in my January 2019 review of portfolio targets and allocations. Previously my Australian and international equity allocation was largely just an unconscious and purely mechanical outcome of the splits in various Vanguard retail funds, and a number of smaller side Australian shareholdings.
The last nine months - by contrast - has seen a concentrated direction of new funds and distributions into Australian shares to achieve the targeted balance. The shift has been significant, with the value of Australian shares only overtaking international holdings in the second half of 2018. International shares have fallen from more than a third of total portfolio assets at this start of this record to closer to a quarter.
[Chart]
At the same time Australian equities now make up 42 per cent of total portfolio, and have just reached 60 per cent of the equity portfolio. All this has occurred as the total equity portfolio has grown from $630 000 at the start of this journey, to over $1.2 million this month.
[Chart]
The main vehicles for this expansion over the past two years has been Betashares A200 and Vanguard's VAS ETFs. More recently, as mentioned, I have added Vanguard's global share ETF (VGS) to allow an avenue to keep within the targeted split with future contributions.
Measuring investment income from tax returns
This month also saw completion of my tax return, including explaining my tax position to a brand new tax agent. The tax assessment from this past financial year provides an additional data point about the taxable investment income being generated by the portfolio.
The graph set out below updates the series published last year on taxable investment income. It is taken from the return items for partnerships and trusts, foreign source income and franking credits (i.e. items 13, 20 and 24 on the return, and not including capital gains) over the past nine years.
[Chart]
This shows that taxable investment income has risen only around five per cent over the past financial year. This likely reflects the decline in higher interest payments from a slow rebalance away from Ratesetter towards equities. Taxable investment income is still well short of both the original objective, and even further short of Objective #2.
[Chart]
As previously outlined, there are a range of factors that likely account for the mismatch between tax return income and received distributions. These could include timing differences, capital gains realisations, and potentially even small errors in how I have added in individual return items in past years. I have also continued to seek to avoid double counting and so understatement is also a possibility, given the formats and labelling of tax returns are not always particularly clear.

Progress

Progress against the objectives, and the additional measures I have reached is set out below.
MeasurePortfolio All Assets
Objective #1 – $1 598 000 (or $67 000 pa) 108.2% 147.5%
Objective #2 – $1 980 000 (or $83 000 pa) 87.4% 119.1%
Credit card purchases - $73 000 pa 99.3% 135.4%T
otal expenses - $89 000 pa 81.5% 111.1%

Summary

Forward progress has resumed, with the growing warmth and life of spring. The last few months has been a continual reminder that the fickle direction of market winds may play a greater role than sheer saving and investing efforts at this point in the journey. Focusing on the process, rather than the short-term outcome is therefore almost forced upon one - which perhaps is no bad thing after all. Indeed, increasingly I have wondered whether these now ingrained habits and processes will themselves be difficult to break out of, even as I definitively pass some FI benchmarks in future months and years.
The varying winds will also increasingly dictate where additional contributions are to be made. This is the automatic result of targeting an asset allocation with new contributions rather than active rebalancing through selling existing holdings. In fact, it probably constitutes one of the more difficult tests for a chosen risk allocation, as it will tend to result in buying unspectacular portfolio 'laggards', rather than assets that have recently moved up, without the consolation of taking these new funds from locked in profits elsewhere in the portfolio. This can lead to signals that are easier to follow in theory than in practice.
As an example, currently Australian government bond yields are close to historical lows, and potentially heading lower. This is highly relevant to FI planning, as there is some academic evidence that the 'four percent rule' has a higher failure rate in low bond rate environments.
There is also a strong possibility that bonds are close to the end of a forty year decline in yield - and have nowhere to go. The increasing spread of negative yielding government and corporate bonds around the world, however, also holds out equally plausible but very different possibilities, at least in the short term.
This is more than a hypothetical issue and uncertainty. Through the next 12 months it is possible that my target asset allocation will start signalling a need to buy bonds. This would involve a need to find the right investment vehicle to access this asset at least cost.
On the same topic, this month saw an excellent explainer piece from Aussie HiFIRE on bonds, and also a good discussion from Kurt at Pearler on how to put the modern portfolio theory to practical work in FI portfolio design. Youtube content on FI and portfolio issues seems to be improving all the time as well, including this short video on thinking about the role and value of dividends.All such guidance represents a way of keeping a reckoning on the unfolding horizon, its dangers and subtle deceits
.The post and full charts can be seen here.
submitted by thefiexpl to fiaustralia [link] [comments]

Setting of the Sails - Role of Gold and Bitcoin in the FIRE Portfolio

One ship drives east and another drives west With the self-same winds that blow. ‘Tis the set of the sails And not the gales Which tells us the way to go.
Future returns are unknowable with any degree of precision. A portfolio must contend with all that future market prices and developments put before it, whilst seeking to earn the best possible return for the level of risk assumed.
This uncertainty is a core issue for portfolio design. Part of my approach to building my FIRE portfolio has been to target a small allocation to alternatives such as gold and Bitcoin to deliver reduced portfolio volatility, and improved returns. My current target allocation set earlier this year is 7.5 per cent gold and 2.5 per cent Bitcoin. This post explores the reasons for, and basis of, this approach.
Portfolio design - one wind, different directions
In designing the FIRE portfolio, the key guiding principle has been maximising the overall risk-adjusted return, whilst minimising unnecessary volatility.
The important implication of this is that it is not the performance of the individual portfolio parts that I am trying to maximise. Rather, it is the performance of all of the component parts as they interact that is of prime concern.
The objective is for the mix of all of these different holdings to play their part together to enhance portfolio returns or reduce volatility. Decisions on asset allocation - or the mix of assets held - has been repeatedly been shown in academic studies to explain around 90 per cent of the volatility of portfolio returns.
This approach is consistent with the simple guidance to diversify. Underlying it, however, are some observations of modern portfolio theory and the Capital Asset Pricing Model, that can be summarised in the following insights:
At any given time this can mean that one 'wind' will send the individual portfolio components in different directions. In short, the approach is not one that will deliver a portfolio without any losses or low returns in the set of assets held at any given time.
Asset correlation - assessing the crosswinds
The critical ingredients for the approach to be effective are assets that do not move together - that is, uncorrelated assets. A traditional example used in portfolio design are equities and bonds, which have over time often tended to move in opposite directions (e.g. be inversely correlated) in many markets. This is the basis for traditional investment guidance to include greater bond holdings to dampen the volatility of equities.
Gold has tended to have a low correlation to other asset classes. An example of the effects of this on equity portfolios is described in this research paper (pdf) - from the World Gold Council - which found that adding gold holdings to an all equity portfolio both lowered the volatility of returns and increased total returns over the 1968-1996 period (see p.47 and Figure 4.6). The academic evidence for the low correlation of gold to equity returns is, in fact, strong over multiple periods.
Moreover, this diversification benefit appears when most needed. As this recent paper in the International Review of Financial Analysis notes:
…we think that a review of the results from earlier papers on this issue, coupled with our findings, points to the fact that gold is always a hedge or, at worst, always an excellent diversifier of portfolio risk. Gold’s usefulness in managing risk does not disappear in a crisis when the prices of the vast majority of assets tend to be perfectly correlated. (He, 2018)
That is, gold seems to generally hold up as providing non-correlated returns, even when extreme market conditions prevail. Globally, central banks - including Australia's Reserve Bank - also seem to recognise this characteristic. It is in part why central banks collectively own around 17 per cent of gold currently above ground.
Setting the level of gold exposure - competing evidence
There is considerable discussion and debate on the right level of gold holdings to maximise the diversification benefit, and few definitive answers.
The optimum level will vary under most estimation approaches, which inevitably are based on models that build on historical observed relationships and correlations. These correlations themselves vary over time and between markets and countries.
An original study by Jaffe for institutional portfolio managers recommended a 10 per cent allocation against a basket of international equities. Additional studies (pdf) by other authors have recommended 9.5 per cent, and between 0.1 per cent to 12 per cent depending on which country the investor is in. As an example, the country-specific weights typically fell within 3 to 8 per cent for developed countries.
More complex methods than classical mean variance analysis, which take into account the positive skew of gold returns, produce different results again. A 2006 study which examined 1988-2003 data recommended a holding of 4-6 per cent under classical portfolio optimisation approaches, but a lower figure of 2-4 per cent taking return 'skewness' into account.
Diversification and Bitcoin - looking at the record
My purchase of Bitcoin began as an exploration of a new financial technology driven by curiosity. The present question is, however, does it deliver any additional diversification benefits beyond gold holdings?
Conceptually, Bitcoin can be said to share some characteristics with gold that might be expected to reduce any diversification benefit. They both represent highly liquid assets that when held personally are no other parties liability. They are not issued by central banks or other monetary authorities, and they can be transferred. So is there a case for holding just one or the other?
The tentative answer is that despite some conceptual similarities, they do appear to behave differently.
So far, in the decade between July 2009 and February 2019, Bitcoin has shown a low positive correlation to gold (see In Gold We Trust (pdf), p.245). This is consistent with my own observations in my portfolio in the last three and a half year period, with a low correlation of 0.1 over the entire period in the chart below.
[Chart]
On its face it appears Bitcoin may well be a useful complementary alternative holding, offering diversification benefits distinct from other combinations of holdings.
Unlike gold, there is not a clear empirical or academic basis for setting a 'right' level of exposure to Bitcoin. The recent In Gold We Trust report (pdf) discusses and analyses one possible approach - a 70/30 split between gold and Bitcoin, indicating that this delivered similar maximum drawdowns to a gold only portfolio, but with higher returns. Yet this finding is only a function of the extraordinary positive returns from Bitcoin to date, and may not be repeated.
Trade-offs, risks and limits of exposure to alternatives
There are acknowledged trade-offs and risks to investing in alternatives such as gold and Bitcoin.
First, they produce no income or cashflow. Their return is based entirely on capital gains. This is often cited as a definitive proof that they do not represent part of any proper investment portfolio.
Yet, as a part of a portfolio, alternatives can reduce the absolute volatility of the capital value of the portfolio, and - historically in the case of gold, can also increase overall returns. Given final capital value and returns over time are critical inputs into FI, these characteristics are relevant and worth considering.
A potentially stronger objection is that while alternatives may have been useful in the past, they cannot be guaranteed to be so in the future.
That is, the correlations and diversification benefit that has been observed, may disappear. This is entirely possible, and ultimately unknowable. The diversification benefits of gold have a far longer history. Its roles in industry, manufacturing and jewellery would seem likely to continue to guarantee that at any given time there will be some minimum demand for gold, and a relationship between its price and other asset prices that is not perfectly correlated.
For Bitcoin, the same cannot be said. There are many plausible scenarios in which Bitcoin's value declines, it falls in usage, and becomes the equivalent of niche digital collectible with little residual value.
The disappearance or long-term reversal of 'known truths' in finance is not impossible. There are significant periods in capital markets in which bonds outperformed equities, negative yielding debt has moved from something previously unobserved, to a commonplace across many world bond markets. By some measures, global interest rates are at 5 000 year lows. Few developments should be dismissed as inconceivable looking forward.
This suggests that any analysis based on historical trends should be relied on with modest expectations around its accuracy. Yet importantly, this applies not just to speculation around the role and benefits of alternatives. It also applies to traditional investment classes, such as equities or bonds.
For example, the continuation of a positive equity premium for Australia, or any other nation, is not foreordained. Australia's comparatively high equity returns are in fact an anomaly looking across developed countries (see Table 2 and 3, here (pdf)). There are no particularly strong reasons to suggest this will necessarily continue.
Set of the sails - applying the evidence to a FIRE portfolio
The role of gold and Bitcoin are primarily as non-correlated financial instruments for diversification, and as an insurance against extreme capital market events. No actual positive return is assumed for either asset. The evidence discussed above leads me to the following conclusions, for my personal circumstances and risk tolerance.
The alternatives target allocation set earlier this year is 7.5 per cent gold and 2.5 per cent Bitcoin. As of July 2019, a strict reading of these targets suggests I need to moderately lift my exposure to gold, and sell approximately 75 per cent of my Bitcoin holding.
I currently plan to do neither of these things. This is because:
So the sails are set, and the wind will come. These settings allow me to feel that whatever direction they happen to blow, there is the best chance possible based on evidence that they will help in the journey that remains.
The post, source citations and full charts can be viewed here.
Disclaimer: This article does not provide advice and is not a recommendations to invest in either gold, Bitcoin or any alternative assets. It's sole purpose is to provide an explanation of why - in my personal circumstances - I have chosen this exposure.
submitted by thefiexpl to fiaustralia [link] [comments]

Leaving Australian Tax Residency and Cashing out Crypto Overseas Question

Hey guys, I have had a tax questions that my crypto accountant hasn't been able to answer definitively and has recommended I go to the ATO to get a private ruling. I thought I would at least post here to see what you guys think.
I am dual US/Australian citizen having spent my whole life living here. I understand that capital gains rates are lower in the US and I have considered leaving Australia and becoming a permanent resident of the US and cashing out my crypto over there.
The issue is losing my Australian tax residency so that I don't have to pay capital gains tax to Australia while living in the states. Generally you either have to pay capital gains on your Australian assets before you go or pay an even higher rate should you cash them out while you are overseas.
My accountant believes that because Bitcoin is not an Australian based asset I wont have to pay capital gains if I sell them overseas. I have had a look around and have not been able to get much info on this specific case.
Has anyone heard of anything like this? I hope he is correct but I cant find much to support his belief this is the case and I don't want to risk things on a guess. Any thoughts would be helpful.
Cheers
submitted by HelloMyDroogs to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

Laying within Reach | Monthly Portfolio Update - April 2019

Consider anything that is humanly possible and appropriate to lie within your own reach too. – Marcus Aurelius, Meditations VI.19
This is my twenty-ninth portfolio update. I complete this update monthly to check my progress against my goals.
Portfolio goals
My objectives are to reach a portfolio of: * $1 598 000 by 31 December 2020. This should produce a real income of about $67 000 (Objective #1) * $1 980 000 by 31 July 2023, to produce a passive income equivalent to $83 000 (Objective #2)
Both of these are based on an expected average real return of 4.19%, or a nominal return of 7.19%, and are expressed in 2018 dollars.
Portfolio summary
Vanguard Lifestrategy High Growth Fund – $756 860 Vanguard Lifestrategy Growth Fund – $43 529 Vanguard Lifestrategy Balanced Fund – $78 182 Vanguard Diversified Bonds Fund – $104 579 Vanguard Australia Shares ETF (VAS) – $79 067 Betashares Australia 200 ETF (A200) – $231 216 Telstra shares (TLS) – $1 801 Insurance Australia Group shares (IAG) – $13 742 NIB Holdings shares (NHF) – $6 900 Gold ETF (GOLD.ASX) – $83 465 Secured physical gold – $13 438 Ratesetter* (P2P lending) – $25 278 Bitcoin – $81 867 Raiz* app (Aggressive portfolio) – $15 154 Spaceship Voyager* app (Index portfolio) – $1 880 BrickX* (P2P rental real estate) – $4 629
Total value: $1 541 587 (+$61 677)
Asset allocation
Australian shares – 41.6% (3.4% under) Global shares – 23.4% Emerging markets shares – 2.7% International small companies – 3.5% Total international shares – 29.7% (0.3% under) Total shares – 71.3% (3.7% under) Total property securities – 0.3% (0.3% over) Australian bonds – 5.9% International bonds – 10.9% Total bonds – 16.8% (1.8% over) Cash – 1.2% Gold – 6.3% Bitcoin – 5.3% Gold and alternatives – 11.6% (1.6% over)
Presented visually, below is a high-level view of the current asset allocation of the portfolio.
[Chart]
Comments The portfolio has experienced a positive month, with a total growth of $61 677. This places the portfolio well above its previous highs and potentially within two to three average months of reaching Objective #1.
[Chart]
The portfolio grew by the third highest absolute monthly amount since start of this record. Growth in the value of both Australian and international equities was a major part of this increase. This was assisted by the final dividends from Australian equities ETFs Vanguard VAS ($903) and Betashares A200 ($1894) that were received this month. These were reinvested in the A200 ETF with a small proportion being set aside to meet future associated tax liabilities.
[Chart]
Nearing the end of 'the big rebalance'?
As the end of the financial year draws closer, choices around where to allocate future contributions and reinvestments may become slightly less clear cut than they have been for much of the journey.
This is because barring any major market movements, the portfolio is nearing the end of what could be called 'the big rebalance' that commenced at the start of this record. This has involved consistently targeting higher equity allocations (first 65 per cent, then 75 per cent) and lower bond holdings.
The movements involved in this rebalancing phase have been significant. Contributions and capital growth have lifted the portfolio's overall equity allocation from around 60 per cent over 2017 to around 71 per cent currently.
[Chart]
The value of total equity holdings has increased from around $630 000 to close to $1.1 million since January 2017. Within this expanded equity portfolio, a significant change in composition has also occurred, as the chart above shows. Gradually, Australian shares have moved from representing a minority of total equity holdings - around 40 per cent of all shares - to now approaching 60 per cent. In pure value terms, Australian share holdings have increased from $277 000 to around $641 000 since the start of this record. The split between Australian and international shares is now close to my selected optimal position.
Over the same period portfolio bond holdings have fallen from around 25 per cent, to just 16.8 per cent. This has occurred by total bond and fixed interest holdings remaining at approximately $250 000.
This all means that future contributions, reinvestments or portfolio decisions may over time become less singularly focused on the purchase of Australian shares ETFs such as A200. The focus may shift to more a diverse and dynamic re-balancing approach, in which the objective is to gently and directionally 'nudge' the portfolio into alignment with its target allocations using a mix of new contributions and reinvested distributions. This will not happen all at once, as the equity portfolio is still just short of the target of 75 per cent, and market movements can have their own unpredictable impacts.
Role of Bitcoin: uncorrelated manoeuvres in the dark
An unusual source of around one-third of the portfolio growth this month has been an appreciation in the value of Bitcoin holdings. This increased by around $18 000 this month.
Over the past year or so Bitcoin has more frequently made a negative contribution, reducing the overall portfolio. I still regard it as a highly speculative element of the portfolio included not because I recommend its purchase by an investor, but simply by virtue of not wishing to ignore its current value and its contribution to net portfolio value.
It also remains in the portfolio as an asset under an assumption that it is uncorrelated to other similar defensive holdings, whilst sharing some of the characteristics of gold (for example, it does not represent another party's liability). Over this month reflecting on these issues, I had time to undertake a brief analysis of whether it had actually delivered on this goal or promise of being a non-correlated asset, and whether it moved in a distinct way compared to the existing gold holdings in the portfolio.
The chart below sets out the measured correlation between the main portfolio gold holdings (GOLD.ASX) and Bitcoin, over the past three or so years.
[Chart]
From the chart it can be seen that the correlations are highly unstable, and do average close to zero over the period. This means that compared to the gold holdings, Bitcoin is likely to be delivering some diversification benefit - and adding to overall portfolio stability.
Progress
Progress against the objectives, and the additional measures I have reached is set out below.
Measure Portfolio All Assets
Objective #1 – $1 598 000 (or $67 000 pa) 96.5% 133.7% Objective #2 – $1 980 000 (or $83 000 pa) 77.9% 107.9% Credit card purchases - $73 000 pa 88.5% 122.7% Total expenses - $96 000pa 67.3% 93.3%
Summary
The past month has brought the portfolio to within a short distance of Objective #1. Indeed, it could be only around 2 to 3 months away using the average monthly trend of the past three years.
This is causing further reflection on the exact psychological meaning of reaching that first target. It is most definitely not a trigger point to retire early. The existence of the second portfolio objective is clear recognition of that. Rather, it feels more like a minimum threshold, that once crossed, is some assurance of a minimum future living standard set around the Australian average, regardless of employment or common life events.
Each step beyond this point will, I think, feel like an additional protection, building towards Objective #2. Therefore the gap between Objective #1 and #2 feels like a large 'safety zone' in which life events can be viewed with a greater detachment and objectivity. That is, they can be viewed as simply opportunities and inevitable change, rather than as threats or obstacles to achieving the security of financial independence.
This need to be tempered always with the caveat that, viewed over the long term, no simple 'rule' of 4 per cent or otherwise will offer a complete guarantee. Simply put, over long periods nothing is safe from adverse events. This recent podcast of some of the most well-known US financial independence bloggers - including those with a quantitative and analytical bent such as Big ERN - provided some excellent insights into assessing the risks of FI in a balanced way.
A point emerging from the discussion is agreement that over period above 30 years, financial independence plans that rely on amortisation - consumption or a drawdown of capital - are not amenable to simple set and forget '4 per cent rule' style approaches often promoted. Rather, they require a more nuanced approach, and an appreciation that even 'successful' outcomes can feel indistinguishable from failures, potentially for years or a decade or more. Flexibility is recommended, yet as BigERN's analysis shows, this is no panacea.
The Australian FI community continues its pleasing growth, with Snowball Journey recently joining the community. Through the Easter holidays I also listened to an intriguing ChooseFI podcast on dividend investing and read through an interesting report from the Grattan Institute on retirement incomes (pdf).
As Autumn begins to fade, I cannot help but wonder if a period of strong market gains will themselves fade and transform themselves in coming months. Even amidst such movements, however, I will be looking down the path towards the June distributions with curiosity and anticipation at what could lay within reach.
The post and graphs can be viewed here.
submitted by thefiexpl to fiaustralia [link] [comments]

Tax Megathread

BitcoinAus Tax Megathread

DISCLAIMER

The purpose of this post is to provide crypto-currency investors and traders with a basic understanding of the laws and prinipals regarding tax treatment for crypto-currency in Australia (including but no limited to Bitcoin) as it applies to individuals, not businesses.
At this point in time, this post does not attempt to explain tax treatment for businesses, or when trading in bitcoin is and is not classified as a business.
This post is a work in progress and will be updated and improved on an ongoing basis.
The Author(s) of this post are not tax accountants. Any advice given and/or any facts presented are based solely on our personal understanding of the rules and determinations made by the ATO and do not constitute financial advice. Please feel free to message any of the moderator team should you wish to dispute any of the facts or wording listed here. Please also feel free to offer suggestions and/or improvements that can be made in the comment section.
When in doubt, you should always seek professional advice from a tax accountant.

Captial Gains Tax

First and foremost, lets look at this exerpt from the ATO brief titled "Tax treatment of crypto-currencies in Australia" [1]
Transacting with bitcoin is akin to a barter arrangement, with similar tax consequences. Our view is that bitcoin is neither money nor a foreign currency, and the supply of bitcoin is not a financial supply for goods and services tax (GST) purposes. Bitcoin is, however, an asset for capital gains tax (CGT) purposes.
So this tells us two things.
1) Crypto-currencies are treated as assets for captial gains tax (CGT) purposes.
2) Crypto-currency trasnactions are treated as barter arrangements, with similar tax consequences.
Calculating capital gains tax (CGT) for your investments may sound daunting, but it is really very easy.
If you sell a capital asset, such as real estate or shares (or in our case, crypto-currencies), you usually make a capital gain or a capital loss. This is the difference between what it cost you to acquire the asset and what you receive when you dispose of it.[2]
You need to report capital gains and losses in your income tax return and pay tax on your capital gains. Although it's referred to as capital gains tax (CGT), this is actually part of your income tax, not a separate tax.[2] This means that the amount of CGT you pay will depend on your own marginal tax rate.
When you sell or otherwise dispose of an asset, it's called a capital gains tax (CGT) event. This is the point at which you make a capital gain or loss.[2]
Lets work through an example; Alice purchased 1BTC at a price of $6000 AUD per BTC in Janurary of 2016. Over the ourse of the year, the price of Bitcoin increased to $10000 AUD. Alice then sold 0.5BTC in December 2017 at a price of $10000 per BTC. Therefore the total amount gained from the sale was $5000. It is at this point in time that a CGT event is generated. Alice must now calucalte the profit for this CGT event so that she may declare it on her 2017/2018 tax return (As this is financial year that the CGT event occured).
The first step is to calculate the cost base for the 0.5BTC that was sold. In our example this is easy, Alice originally paid $6000 for 1BTC, which gives us a cost base of $3000 for 0.5BTC. The amount Alice received from sale of the 0.5BTC was $5000, so she subtracts the cost base from the sale price ($5000 - $3000) which leaves her with $2000 profit. This is the amount that Alice will record on her 2017/2018 tax return as a Capital Gain.

Other considerations

There are a number of other considerations to make when calculating profit for a CGT event.
  • The ATO offer individuals a 50% discount on capital gains when the disposed asset has been held for a period of time that exceeds 12 months. The way to make this calculation is as follows; Subtract the cost base from the capital proceeds, deduct any capital losses, then reduce by the relevant discount percentage. (50% for individuals). So in our above example, Alice will only be taxed on a $1000 capital gain had she held the Bitcoin for > 12 months. [3]. Alice would still need to declare the full capital gain on her tax return, but she would select the 'discount' method when performing the calculation. [9].
  • Any incidental costs associated with purchasing, holding, moving, and/or disposing of an asset may also be deducted from the capital proceeds prior to calculating the capital gain. The ATO provide the following example [4]
    The following example (with values inserted) illustrates how to calculate a capital gain:
    Capital proceeds (sale price) $10,210
    Less Cost base:
    • Purchase price $6,000
    • Incidental costs of purchase (Brokerage fee and GST) $100
    • Incidental costs of sale (Brokerage fees and GST) $110 $6,210
    Capital gain $4,000
    Further details for calculating the cost base, and reduced cost base of an asset can be found here.
  • Any capital losses may be carried forward from previous tax years and used to offset capital gains (if any) in the current tax year. [8]
  • It's important to note that losses are applied to any gains before applying the CGT discount. So if you have a carried forward loss of $1,000 and make a gain eligible for the discount of $2,000, your net gain is ($2,000 - $1,000) * 50% = $500.

Bitcoin as a personal use asset

Where you use bitcoin to purchase goods or services for personal use or consumption, any capital gain or loss from disposal of the bitcoin will be disregarded (as a personal use asset) provided the cost of the bitcoin is $10,000 or less. [1]
Personal use assets are CGT assets, other than collectables, used or kept mainly for the personal use or enjoyment of you or your associates. [5]
Personal use assets include:
  • boats
  • furniture
  • electrical goods
  • household items
Bitcoin that is kept or used mainly to make purchases of items for personal use or consumption ordinarily will be kept or used mainly for personal use. Bitcoin that is kept or used mainly for the purpose of profit-making or investment, or to facilitate purchases or sales in the course of carrying on business is not used or kept mainly for personal use. [6]
The ATO have released a Ruling Compendium to accompany TD2014/25EC. One section of this compendium provides clarification on when bitcoin will be a personal use asset.[10] (Item 10)
Item 10 section 1 states the following:
A taxpayer who purchases bitcoin with the intention of holding onto them for a number of years so that they appreciate in value and the profit can be spent in their retirement, is using the bitcoin for investment or profit making purposes and the bitcoin is not a personal use asset.[10]
Further, Item 11 section 3 states the following:
All of the facts and circumstances regarding the acquisition, use and disposal of the bitcoin are relevant to determining whether the bitcoin are a personal use asset.[10]
I urge everyone to read the Compendium, specifically items 10 and 11. These clarifications mean that bitcoin cannot be disposed of as a 'personal use asset' if they were bought or held with the intention of making a profit.

Bitcoin barter arrangements & trading crypto pairs

Transacting with bitcoin is akin to a barter arrangement. [1]
In its simplest form, bartering involves the direct exchange of goods or services for other goods or services without reference to money or a money value. [7]
Early we discussed the fact that Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies are treated and assets, and not currencies. What this means is that whenever you acquire crypto-currency, you are acquiring an asset. This means that trading crypto pairs is essentially a barter arrangement involving the disposal of one asset and an acquisition of a different asset. By definition, this means that you generate a CGT event each and every time you trade a crypto pair. The ATO law regarding barter arrangements tells us that you must assign an AUD value to the disposed asset as well as the acquired asset at the time of the trade. You must then calculate your capital gain or loss using these values.
As a general rule when valuing the consideration arising from barter or countertrade transactions, the ATO will accept a fair market value as adequately reflecting the money value or arm's length value, as applicable. In most cases, the ATO will accept as a fair market value, the cash price which the taxpayer would normally have charged a stranger for the services or for the sale of the goods or property. [7]

Citations

[1] Tax treatment of crypto-currencies in Australia https://www.ato.gov.au/misc/downloads/pdf/qc42159.pdf
[2] Captial Gains Tax https://www.ato.gov.au/General/Capital-gains-tax/
[3] Working out your capital gain https://www.ato.gov.au/General/Capital-gains-tax/Working-out-your-capital-gain-or-loss/Working-out-your-capital-gain/
[4] How to Calculate a Capital Gain or Loss http://www.educatedinvestor.com.au/pages/How-to-Calculate-a-Capital-Gain-or-Loss.html
[5] Personal use assets https://www.ato.gov.au/general/capital-gains-tax/cgt-assets-and-exemptions/#Personal_use_assets
[6] Tax determination - Is Bitcoin a 'CGT Asset' for the purposes of subsection 108-5(1) of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 ? http://law.ato.gov.au/atolaw/view.htm?DocID=TXD/TD201426/NAT/ATO/00001
[7] Barter arrangements http://law.ato.gov.au/atolaw/view.htm?docid=ITIT2668/NAT/ATO/00001
[8] Capital losses on shares and units https://www.ato.gov.au/General/Capital-gains-tax/Shares,-units-and-similar-investments/Capital-losses-on-shares-and-units/
[9] The discount method of calculating your capital gain https://www.ato.gov.au/General/Capital-gains-tax/Working-out-your-capital-gain-or-loss/Working-out-your-capital-gain/The-discount-method-of-calculating-your-capital-gain/
[10] TD 2014/25EC Ruling Compendium https://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/document?LocID=%22CTD%2FTD2014EC25%2FNAT%2FATO%2F00001%22&PiT=99991231235958

Additional documents and links:

Elements of the cost base and reduced cost base
Types of CGT events - specifically type A1 - Disposal
Cost Base
Selling an asset and other CGT events
Australian Crypto FAQ
Tax crime explained
ATO Interest and penalties
Record keeping for CGT
submitted by Black_Light to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

Australian Tax Law and Crypto

Crypto and Tax Australia - Date: 26 March 2018
I was sent this by the tax office:
We have just updated our website and cemented our position on cryptocurrencies. For more information see Tax treatment of cryptocurrencies or go to ato.gov.au and search for QC 42159.
Capital Gains Tax
When does it apply?
Currently individual Cryptocurrencies are a Capital Gains Tax (CGT) Asset..
When you sell or otherwise dispose of an asset it's called a capital gains tax (CGT) event. This is the point at which you make a capital gain or loss.
Therefore, a CGT event applies each time crypto currencies are traded (sold or converted) - whether they are traded for another currency or cashed out. - regardless if there is no exchange of funds (AUD$).
For every capital gains tax (CGT) event that happens to your assets during the year, you need to work out your capital gain or loss.
If you have both capital gains and capital losses, you also have to work out your net capital gain or net capital loss for the year.
When working out your capital gains or losses, include the transaction conversion in Australian dollars at the time of trading on your spreadsheet.
How do you record Capital gains or losses to your Income tax return?
At the end of the financial year your capital gains can be reduced by the capital losses. This is then added to your income. Capital Gains and or losses are recorded in your income tax return, under the Capital Gains section.
Capital gains discount
Capital gain can be reduced by 50% for individuals if held for 12 months or more.
For information see Capital gains tax or go to ato.gov.au and search for QC 22147
————————————————————
What I have learnt about ATO laws and crypto in Australia in my own words:
Ok- so I have now had about 2 hours discussion with the Tax Office and want to outline what I have learnt - for good and bad. If you want to be legal this is what you have to do. I submitted these points to a tax office rep. who verified they are correct as at 26th March 2018.
  1. Every single sale is a taxable event- that means coin to coin and coin to AUD - every single one! That is a shock to most of us - but unfortunately true.
  2. Every time you make a gain you have to record it and it is a taxable event. EG- you buy ETH with AUD- then buy NEO - if this took 1 hr and in that time ETH went up by $10 before u bought the NEO you just made $10 taxable dollars on the ETH as u buy the NEO!
  3. The tax office does not concern itself with what we call "profit," that our folio app may show, it is concerned with net gain or losses on individual transactions.
  4. So EVERY transaction (buy and sell) has to be logged with the corresponding AUD value so gains and losses can be determined.
  5. Blockfolio app is perfectly set up for tracking all of this - If you diligently add each transaction accurately, it will log the info you need in AUD. You can look at a purchase price for a coin in AUD - the sell value in AUD and determine gain or loss on each sale- and log it.
  6. I am also using a second ledger in an excel doc. as another record in case the app dies for whatever reason. I will transfer the details from blockfolio into this file on each transaction.
  7. The tracking headers for the excel doc would be something like:
Coin
Date
Amount
AUD buy
AUD Sell
Profit or loss:
  1. If you sell a coin at a loss- it comes off your taxable total at end June 30- as do all your fees and other expenses- eg's a Ledger, PC, ISP fees, backup HDD, etc (some may have to be depreciated over a few years).
  2. Some good news is that if you sell an alt coin into BTC or ETH at a profit (attracting CGT) and then into AUD, (it will be approx. the same value if done quickly), the change into AUD is also potentially taxable but there will usually be next to no change in value- if done quickly. You can thus cash out and not have to use something like USD Tether and rebuy whenever you like. The CGT will have applied to the gain as you exited crypto into AUD via ETH or BTC.
  3. Turning crypto into AUD is not the crux of what attracts CGT- it is every single coin or cash exchange that results in a gain or loss.
  4. Coins you bought at any given time do not attract CGT as they appreciate- only when you sell them. So if you made 500% gains in your portfolio no CGT is attracted until you sell for another coin or AUD.
  5. CGT gains are added to your personal income- so most will be in higher tax brackets.
  6. There is no $10,000 "get out of CGT" clause that applies to crypto.
  7. If you have a partner in life, and purchase crypto currency with joint funds, you have to share the CGT across both of your tax returns. It can be a nominated percentage for this Join Tenant arrangement, but you must be consistent. The percentage you choose at your first return (EG 60/40%) has to be maintained for the entire time you are into crypto.
  8. The tax office has developed and is improving on a tool to help you work out your CGT obligations- it isn't mandatory you use it and should be able to be found on the ATO website.
  9. Coins bought and held for 12 months attract the benefit of a 50% discount in CGT. This applies to specific coins and not "your crypto in general" It does not mean you can buy and sell crypto all year and then turn it into AUD after a year and pay tax on your profit that you cash out.
————————
This process is complex for crypto investors- especially if you are an active day or swing trader- To be compliant with Australian Tax law this is how to do it. Essentially, it is fair as losses and costs are deducted from profit. This process gets hard for crypto traders to bear when we may have bought at one price, made gains then our portfolio drops. In practice, you could be liable for more gains that have attracted CGT than "profit" you show in your portfolio when there is a crash. It's hard to take but it's the way the Aust. Govt. is approaching crypto and all investing actually. At this stage, the ATO is treating crypto like all other investments and some of the differences may, in my opinion, not be fully appreciated by law makers and potentially may change in the future. I expect this would be a slow process.
———————
I realise ppl may say "Well, the tax office doesn't know what I'm up to and I will just declare any taxable gain when I cash out." That is your prerogative- I'm just passing on what the legal approach to this is FYI. Do with this info what you may- I hope it is helpful in some way.
submitted by dmarthick to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Mechtant mondays - Jagoda

Welcome back to Merchant mondays

Merchant mondays is the moment to show your appreciation for the businesses that lead the way in the adoption of cryptocurrencies. Instead of paying with fiat for your next purchase, use this Monday initiative to pay with VTC instead.

This monday I want to highlight Jagoda! Check out some games you can buy with Vertcoin from their website.

On an nice sidenote. I am under the impression that work on the integration of VTC with BTCpayserver is in its final phase (if not complete already). I want to thank everyone who worked on it! Let's use this to get VTC accepted in many new stores!

Debit cards

With UQUID, buying online and sending money to friends is made easier and safer than ever: all you need is an email address. Your money is protected, no personal information is revealed, and you can retrieve the details of every payment at any moment.

Charity

Helperbit is a free and transparent way to support a charity project. You can donate to charity in Vertcoin and give something back to the world.

Education

LearnCrypto offers training about Crypto trading.The team at LearnCrypto.io has dedicated thousands of hours to educating the public and our students in all areas of Cryptocurrencies.

Food

PexPeppers is specialized in "finest chili sauces, jellies, salts, seeds & more." Based in Pueblo, Colorado, USA PexPeppers is selling all over the world.

Garden & Agriculture

Royal Queen Seeds is amongst the fastest growing cannabis seed companies in Europe. After building up many years of experience in growing cannabis seeds in the Netherlands, we decided to launch our own line of cannabis seeds and are now able to offer you quality feminized, autoflowering and medical seeds at a good price.

Gift Cards

Coincards provides Giftcards and was created in July of 2014.
Crypto De Change provides Gift Cards and Silver Buillons since July 2013.
Giftoff is a "digital gift card retailer with the largest range on offer in Europe. Since 2014 we’ve been enabling digital currency users to shop with major retailers like Amazon.co.uk, Steam and Marks & Spencer. We stock over 70 gift cards and accept over 40 digital currencies as well as UK credit and debit cards."
The Sheldon Store is a online store where you can buy giftcards with Cryptocurrencies. You can buy Amazon, iTunes, Google Play, PlayStation, Uber, Netflix (and many more) gift cards. The Sheldon store team consists of cryptocurrency enthusiasts working together, driven by a single goal; to create a world where everyday people earn, spend and invest cryptocurrency like they would any other fiat currency in their everyday life.

Goods/Merchandise

Astronaut Apparel makes every effort to operate in a transparent and ethical manner. We will be integrating blockchain features to help with supply chain management, so that you can see exactly where your apparel was made.
Barter4Crypto is a platform where users can offer and pay each other in cryptocurrencies for services and products.
Bullcrypto is a brand new apparel shop that sells everything from tshirts to hats or from mugs to posters!
An online marketplace (similar to Ebay) with buyer and seller protection. This platform allows you to buy and sell products for Crypto with escrow possibilities for Vertcoin.
Cyroline is on "the tireless hunt for the special in the fashion world, the perfect fusion of individual styles, quality and sustainability." In physical stores you can pay with Vertcoin in Germany: Lübeck, Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne, Stuttgart.
C&P provides crypto related fashion and is "shipping worldwide with live rates and tracking."
Crypto Compound provides "cryptothemed items" like fashion, mugs & more.
Cryptoble provides "apparel and more". Here are crypto related shirts & mugs.
A webshop selling Crypto mugs (obviously) and some other cool items such as Tshirts and Drones.
Epic Pants is an online retailer who sells products in the categories hardware, apparel, styles, gear, fun, music and art.
GeekBox "offers a wide variety of services including but not limited to basic computer setup, repair, virus removal, server setup, network setup, consulting, purchasing, cloud computing advice, gaming system and electronic repair." As a nice special GeekBox IT provides a Vertcoin Tshirt.
Hipptee provides a range of different cryptocurrency tshirts.
Hodler Tees is a cryptocurrency centered tshirt company based in Frisco Texas! (USA) We sell all things crypto related from hats to tshirts and even posters!
KPV provides Vaporizers, "electronic devices that help you vaporize your material into vapor for cleaner inhalation. People looking to quit smoking cigarettes are the main reason behind vapes."
Founded in 2018, their mission is to promote cryptocurrencies in popular culture with high-quality crypto apparel.
LP is an online store and community. We service the world, no order is too small or too large.
Luma Cards is selling greeting cards for all kinds of occasions. You can now buy high-quality art-based greeting cards with Vertcoin.
"At Nakamoto Clothing, we're passionate about designing and curating a selection of apparel to help grow this movement of change. And we're electrified AF!", international shipping.
Quinsolo proudly accepts decentralized cryptocurrency payments for their crypto themed products.
Online marketplace selling crypto embroided polo shirts
Spreadshirt provides shirts and more. Based in Greensburg, USA, the owner comes from the Netherlands.
Teepublic provides apparel, home goods, shirts, stickers, mugs & more.
The Chopmaster is a woodworker that sells a variety of wooden accessories.
RB gives "independent artists a meaningful new way to sell their creations. Today, we connect over 400k artists and designers across the planet with millions of passionate fans." RB provides a huge asortiment of designed products like bags, wall art, home decor, apparel, stationary & more.
WikiLeaks is a multinational media organization and associated library. It was founded by its publisher Julian Assange in 2006. The shop provides shirts, posters and asseccoires.
Zazzle is a "marketplace, you'll find customizable products, art and createyourown products just waiting for you. We're PhD's, professional artists, manufacturing gurus, patent holders, inventors, musicians, and more. Everything we do is an expression of love." As a nice special Z provides Vertcoin shirts.

Medical

Acupuncture in Massachusetts

Multimedia Services

RDS is Central Virginia’s drone service specialists. From preparation to content delivery, we perform all work to perfection. We can act as both an aerial film consultant or as the remote pilot in charge on your next projects.
Calvin West is a music producer and lyric video artist. Currently based in Spain but with project all around the world. You get a discount if you pay with Vertcoin. Take a look at his projects!

Professional (law) Services

Burrell Law "Our New York Citybased attorneys provide a broad range of transactional legal services" Every large business was once a small business. We are here to help you find a solution for your legal needs.
Bitcoin Tax is "calculating capital gains/losses for any cryptocurrency. Do you know the costbasis of every coin you own? Are you tracking the profits and new basis when you spend or sell? Can you work out the best way to identify your trades to optimize your taxes? Let us do it for you."
The Crypto Lawyers "we are a team of U.S. qualified lawyers dedicated to helping individuals, businesses, and organizations navigate the legal intricacies of cryptocurrency and blockchain technology. We commit ourselves to strategically and aggressively represent our clients in their transactional and litigation matters."

Printing

"Catdi is a commercial printing company with additional specialization in web design. Offering costeffective commercial printing, direct mail, graphic design and web solutions to small businesses. Proudly Serving Houston and surrounding communities for over 10 years."

Technology & Internet

AirVPN is a VPN based on OpenVPN and operated by activists and hacktivists in defence of net neutrality, privacy and against censorship.
With Crpto.space, you can get all the information you spend time checking, instantly every time you open a browser on your desktop or mobile device. Premium package includes the vertcoin homepage and wallpapers.
Jagoda (strawberry) is a videogames platform aiming to distribute digital services for cryptocurrencies that show a direct interest in social activism on different layers.
Evolution Host is a hosting provider where you can pay with Vertcoin. They offer VPS hosting, IRC hosting and game servers on several locations around the world with highend hardware.
"FastTech is the technocentric destination for all your geeky needs and more. FastTech is committed to become the most loved and trusted electronics marketplace by offering superior shopping experience, timely shipping, and stellar customer service."
The first GPS tracking company to accept cryptocurrency as payment. Easy to install and easy to use with options for just about any type of vehicle or trailer.

Video Games

Cavemen Studios is a developer of video games. "Having over a century of combined experience on how video games tick, we've finally decided it's time to start creating our own products."
"Keys4Coins is one of the first pc game stores who only accept cryptocurrency as payment. Our store is simple to use and you can shop anonymously. Only an email is required so you can receive the license."
"Our aim is to provide the fastest, easiest place to buy Xbox Live Gold subscriptions with cryptocurrencies"

Wallets & miscellaneous

Designed Vertcoin public and private wallets that can be used as paper wallets or given as gifts.
LaserLightning provides one etched wooden Vertcoin with the Vertcoin logo burned into one side, and your custom QR code on the back. These coins are approx 1.5 inches in diameter.

(NSFW) Adult shops

Toys4Sex is Australia's Online Adult store retailer intended for men and women. Toys4Sex comes with a specially selected range of products that has made its mark within the Australian adult market place.
submitted by thatmanontheright to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20191110(Market index 39 — Fear state)

Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20191110(Market index 39 — Fear state)

https://preview.redd.it/0q7wtsexcux31.jpg?width=500&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=11f3e1e0ca2f4da306bdac0b8bbe5ff88da82b70

BaFin Launches Market Survey Into Crypto Derivatives Germany’s financial regulator BaFin has launched a survey that contains 19 questions in five subject blocks and is aimed at all market participants, including investors, consumer protection associations, providers, and issuers, as well as interest groups. With the survey, BaFin intends to build “a detailed picture of the market of derivatives featuring cryptocurrencies as an underlying asset and its potential risks.” According to the Financial Services Supervision Act, the authority is “committed to the protection of collective consumer interests” and, against this background, observes and analyzes “the market situation with regard to possible consumer protection issues.”
PBoC Official: It’s Not Appropriate To Launch Global Stablecoin Currently MU Changchun, head of the Digital Currency Research Institute at the People’s Bank of China (PBoC), claimed at the 10th Caixin Summit held on Nov 10 that it is not appropriate to introduce a global stablecoin until legal, regulatory and risk-control issues are resolved. “The global stablecoin ecosystem as a whole can be subject to systemically important supervision. It is not appropriate to introduce a global stablecoin currently until legal, regulatory, risk-control and other issues are resolved,” he said, adding that “the only effective response for China is to maintain and enhance the status of Chinese yuan in the basket of global reserve currencies, and strive to make it be a strong currency, in order to withstand the challenge of the global stablecoin.
IRS Discovers New Ways To Catch Cryptocurrency Tax Evaders The United States’ Internal Revenue Service (IRS) says that a recent meeting with other global tax authorities has given it much deeper insight into how to track those using cryptocurrency to avoid paying taxes. The meeting comes as part of a renewed effort from the IRS to clamp down on tax avoidance facilitated by digital currency. Collectively known as the Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement, representatives of tax authorities from the US, UK, Australia, Canada, and the Netherlands shared their own experiences dealing with the issue of cryptocurrency tax avoidance at the recent forum. The IRS now believes it is more equipped than previously to go after those attempting to hide from the taxman under the guise of cryptocurrency.
https://preview.redd.it/bz65h8yycux31.png?width=473&format=png&auto=webp&s=ae599f7afc6a6e8d135dfb50aae44c46ba6d9266

In the past few days, bitcoin consolidated in a range above the $9,000 support against the US Dollar. However, the bulls failed to protect losses, resulting in a downside break below the key $9,000 support area.
Additionally, there was a break below the 50% Fib retracement level of the upward move from the $7,317 low to $10,578 high. More importantly, there was a break below a major contracting triangle with support near $9,180 on the 4-hours chart of the BTC/USD pair.
It opened the doors for more losses below the $8,920 support and the 100 simple moving average (4-hours). The decline was strong and bitcoin even settled below the $8,800 level.
At the moment, the price is consolidating below the $9,000 and $8,900 levels. An immediate support is near the $8,600 and $8,560 levels. Moreover, the 61.8% Fib retracement level

Encrypted project calendar(November 10, 2019)

Bibox Token (BIX): 10 November 2019 Bibox Summit “Bibox Summit 2019 — Maximizing Profit On Uptrend Season” from 1 PM — 5 PM (ITV) in Ho Chi Minh City. TRON (TRX): 10 November 2019 AMA w/Kucoin Co-founder “Join us on Nov 10, 6:00 PM(PST) for an AMA with TOP, Co-Founder of @kucoincom , in our English Telegram group…”

Encrypted project calendar(November 11, 2019)

PAX/Paxos Standard: Paxos Standard (PAX) 2019 Singapore Financial Technology Festival will be held from November 11th to 15th, and Paxos Standard will attend the conference. Crypto.com Coin (CRO): and 3 others 11 November 2019 Capital Warm-up Party Capital Warm-up Party in Singapore. GoldCoin (GLC): 11 November 2019 Reverse Bitcoin Hardfork The GoldCoin (GLC) Team will be “Reverse Hard Forking” the Bitcoin (BTC) Blockchain…” Horizen (ZEN): 11 November 2019 (or earlier) Horizen Giveaway — Nodes Horizen Giveaway — Win Free Node Hosting! Entries before November 11th. SINOVATE (SIN): 11 November 2019 Roadmap V3 SINOVATE (SIN) Roadmap V3 will be released with new upcoming technologies and proof of concepts! 0x (ZRX): 11 November 2019 0x V3 Vote Ends “The voting period will end on November 11. Learn more about all the exciting features included in v3 below.” Akropolis (AKRO): and 4 others 11 November 2019 Kucoin Blockchain Day “KuCoin Blockchain Day Berlin 2019” from 5 PM — 9:15 PM (CET) in Berlin.

Encrypted project calendar(November 12, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The CoinMarketCap Global Conference will be held at the Victoria Theatre in Singapore from November 12th to 13th Binance Coin (BNB) and 7 others: 12 November 2019 CMC Global Conference “The first-ever CoinMarketCap large-scale event: A one-of-a-kind blockchain / crypto experience like you’ve never experienced before.” Aion (AION) and 17 others: 12 November 2019 The Capital The Capital conference from November 12–13 in Singapore. Loom Network (LOOM): 12 November 2019 Transfer Gateway Update “If you have a dapp that relies on the Transfer Gateway, follow the instructions below to make sure you’re prepared.” Kava (KAVA): 12 November 2019 Updated Mainnet Launch “Our updated mainnet launch will be on Tuesday November 12th at 14:00 UTC.” Crypto.com Coin (CRO): 12 November 2019 Telegram AMA Live AMA with CRO COO and Kucoin’s Global Community Manager on KuCoin’s official English Telegram channel at 16:00 (UTC+8). Chainlink (LINK): and 1 other 12 November 2019 NYC Meetup “Ontology + Future of Blockchain in China Meetup Presented by Chainlink” in NYC from 6:30 PM — 8:30 PM.

Encrypted project calendar(November 13, 2019)

Fetch.ai (FET): 13 November 2019 Cambridge Meetup “Join us for a@Fetch_ai #Cambridge #meetup on 13 November @pantonarms1.” Binance Coin (BNB) and 5 others: 13 November 2019 Blockchain Expo N.A. “It will bring together key industries from across the globe for two days of top-level content and discussion across 5 co-located events…” OKB (OKB): 13 November 2019 Dnipro, Ukraine- Talks Join us in Dnipro as we journey through Ukraine for our OKEx Cryptour on 11 Nov. Centrality (CENNZ): 13 November 2019 AMA Meetup “Ask our CEO@aaronmcdnz anything in person! Join the AMA meetup on 13 November in Singapore.” OKB (OKB): 13 November 2019 OKEx Cryptotour Dnipro “OKEx Cryptour Ukraine 2019 — Dnipro” in Dnipro from 6–9 PM (EET). Vexanium (VEX): 13 November 2019 Dapps Incentive Program Vexanium will give an incentive for every Dapps that is submitted during this program period. Egretia (EGT): 13 November 2019 Post Consensus Invest “2019 NYC Blockchain Gaming & DeFi Party | Post Consensus Invest” in NYC from 7–9 PM. Holo (HOT): 13 November 2019 AMA “Submit your questions before the #AMA on Nov 13th @ 5PM — 5:45PM UTC”

Encrypted project calendar(November 14, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 2019 BlockShow Asia Summit will be held at Marina Bay Sands, Singapore from November 14th to 15th. Binance Coin (BNB): and 4 others 14 November 2019 BlockShow Asia 2019 BlockShow Asia 2019 at Marina Bay Sands Expo, Singapore from November 14–15. Basic Attention Token (BAT): 14 November 2019 London Privacy Meetup “If you’re in London on Nov. 14th, don’t miss our privacy meetup! The Brave research team, our CPO @johnnyryan, as well as @UoE_EFI Horizen (ZEN): 14 November 2019 Weekly Insider Team updates at 3:30 PM UTC/ 11:30 AM EDT: Engineering, Node network, Product/UX, Helpdesk, Legal, BD, Marketing, CEO Closing thoughts, AMA. IOTA (MIOTA): 14 November 2019 Berlin Meetup From Construction to Smart City: IOTA, Maschinenraum & Thinkt Digital will explain, using concrete use cases, how to gain real value from.. Dash (DASH): 14 November 2019 Q3 Summary Call “Dash Core Group Q3 2019 Summary Call — Thursday, 14 November 2019” NEO (NEO): 14 November 2019 NeoFest Singapore Meetup “Glad to have@Nicholas_Merten from DataDash as our host for #NeoFest Singapore meetup on 14th Nov!” ANON (ANON): 14 November 2019 ANONIO Wallet Upgrade In conjunction with the Echelon Update, the ANONIO wallet will also be receiving an upgrade!

Encrypted project calendar(November 15, 2019)

TRON (TRX): 15 November 2019 Cross-chain Project “The #TRON cross-chain project will be available on Nov. 15th” Bluzelle (BLZ): 15 November 2019 (or earlier) CURIE Release CURIE release expected by early November 2019. Zebi (ZCO): 15 November 2019 ZEBI Token Swap Ends “… We will give 90 days to all the ERC 20 token holders to swap out their tokens into Zebi coins.” OKB (OKB): 15 November 2019 OKEx Talks — Vilnius “Join us for a meetup on 15 Nov (Fri) for our 1st ever Talks in Vilnius, Lithuania.” Zenon (ZNN): 15 November 2019 Awareness Fund Payout “Distribution of the fund takes place every Friday until Pillars Lock-in Phase is completed.”

Encrypted project calendar(November 16, 2019)

Bancor (BNT): and 2 others 16 November 2019 Crypto DeFiance-Singapore “Crypto DeFiance is a new global DeFi event embracing established innovators, financial market disruptors, DApp developers…” NEM (XEM): 16 November 2019 Developer’s Event “BLOCKCHAIN: Creation of Multifirma services” from 10:50 AM — 2 PM.

Encrypted project calendar(November 17, 2019)

OKB (OKB): 17 November 2019 OKEx Talks — Lagos Join us on 17 Nov for another OKEx Talks, discussing the “Life of a Crypto Trader”.

Encrypted project calendar(November 18, 2019)

Maker (MKR): 18 November 2019 MCD Launch “BIG changes to terminology are coming with the launch of MCD on Nov. 18th Say hello to Vaults, Dai, and Sai.”

Encrypted project calendar(November 19, 2019)

Lisk (LSK): 19 November 2019 Lisk.js “We are excited to announce liskjs2019 will take place on November 19th. This all day blockchain event will include…” Encrypted project calendar(November 20, 2019) OKB (OKB): 20 November 2019 OKEx Cryptour Odessa Ukr “Join us in Odessa as we journey through Ukraine for our OKEx Cryptour!

Encrypted project calendar(November 21, 2019)

Cardano (ADA): and 2 others 21 November 2019 Meetup Netherlands (AMS) “This meetup is all about how to decentralize a blockchain, the problems and differences between Proof-of-Work and Proof-of-Stake…” Cappasity (CAPP): 21 November 2019 Virtuality Paris 2019 “Cappasity to demonstrate its solution for the interactive shopping experience at Virtuality Paris 2019.” Horizen (ZEN): 21 November 2019 Weekly Insider Team updates at 3:30 PM UTC/ 11:30 AM EDT: Engineering, Node network, Product/UX, Helpdesk, Legal, BD, Marketing, CEO Closing thoughts, AMA. OKB (OKB): 21 November 2019 OKEx Talks — Johannesburg “Join us the largest city of South Africa — Johannesburg where we will host our OKEx Talks on the 21st Nov.” IOST (IOST): 22 November 2019 Singapore Workshop Join the Institute of Blockchain for their 2nd IOST technical workshop in Singapore on 22 Nov 2019. The workshop includes IOST’s key tech. OKB (OKB): 22 November 2019 St. Petersberg Talks “Join us in St. Petersberg on 22 Nov as we answer your questions on Crypto Security. “

Encrypted project calendar(November 22, 2019)

IOST (IOST): 22 November 2019 Singapore Workshop Join the Institute of Blockchain for their 2nd IOST technical workshop in Singapore on 22 Nov 2019. The workshop includes IOST’s key tech OKB (OKB): 22 November 2019 St. Petersberg Talks “Join us in St. Petersberg on 22 Nov as we answer your questions on Crypto Security. “

Encrypted project calendar(November 27, 2019)

OKB (OKB): 27 November 2019 OKEx Cryptour Vinnytsia “Join us in Vinnytsia as we journey through Ukraine for our OKEx Cryptour!” Fetch.ai (FET): 27 November 2019 London Meetup “Join us on 27 November @primalbasehq to hear an exciting progress report as we prepare for the launch of our #mainnet”

Encrypted project calendar(November 28, 2019)

Horizen (ZEN): 28 November 2019 Weekly Insider Team updates at 3:30 PM UTC/ 11:30 AM EDT: Engineering, Node network, Product/UX, Helpdesk, Legal, BD, Marketing, CEO Closing thoughts, AMA.

Encrypted project calendar(November 30, 2019)

Ethos (ETHOS): 30 November 2019 (or earlier) Rebranding “In November, we unveil the broker token, a dynamic utility token to power our commission-free crypto trading and broker platform, Voyager.” Digitex Futures (DGTX): 30 November 2019 Public Testnet Launch “…We can expect to see the world’s first zero-commission futures trading platform live on the Ethereum public testnet from 30th November.” Monero (XMR): 30 November 2019 Protocol Upgrade “Preliminary information thread regarding the scheduled protocol upgrade of November 30.” Chiliz (CHZ): 30 November 2019 (or earlier) Fiat to CHZ Exchanges “We will add another two fiat to $CHZ exchanges in November…” Skrumble Network (SKM): 30 November 2019 (or earlier) P2P & Group Calling “P2P & Group Video Calling,” during November 2019. Aergo (AERGO): 30 November 2019 (or earlier) Mainnet 2.0 Upgrade Mainnet 2.0 Protocol update by end of November. Akropolis (AKRO): 30 November 2019 (or earlier) Beta Release “All functionality has been deployed to mainnet.” Nash Exchange (NEX): 30 November 2019 (or earlier) Mobile Strategy Phase 2 “Phase 2 of our mobile strategy will be live soon with our wallet and portfolio app hitting stores in November!”

Encrypted project calendar(November 31, 2019)

Wanchain (WAN): 31 December 2019 (or earlier) Wanchain 4.0 Release Wanchain 4.0, which introduces private chains integration and multi-coin wallet, released in Dec 2019. QuarkChain (QKC): 31 December 2019 (or earlier) Token Testnet Release Testnet for Multi-Native-Token and New Consensuses.

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Bitcoin & Cryptocurrency Tax Australia 2018 - YouTube

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